Dog Health

Dog Health

Uncover dog breed-specific health information, including common hereditary and health concerns, prevention tactics, and breakthroughs in treatments. Read our dog health articles below.

Dog Articles

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When an easy-to-use and inexpensive DNA genetic test for centronuclear myopathy (CNM) became available in 2005, it seemed only a matter of years before the debilitating muscle disease in Labrador Retrievers would begin to fade away.

Canine lymphoma is one of the five most common cancers in dogs. Among the affected breeds, German Shepherd Dogs are considered at high risk.

Cancer, often described as renegade cells growing out of control, is the leading cause of disease related death in dogs. When a dog is diagnosed with cancer, an owner faces uncertainty about the long-term prognosis.

Swedish researchers count Golden Retrievers among eight breeds in which 10 percent or more of adult dogs have low blood immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels.

A search for a Great Dane puppy for her daughter led Sabrina Wowdzia of Red Deer, Alberta, Canada, to a 4-month-old mantle female, the last in a litter of nine to go to a home.

Breeding Labrador Retrievers is a labor of love for veterinarian Phyllis Giroux of Goldvein, Virginia.

“Tala,” a singleton Siberian Husky puppy, was only 2 weeks old when breeder Jessica Breinholt of Coalville, Utah, realized the puppy always left a wet spot on her clothing when she held her.

Though Poodles are not considered a high-risk breed for the autoimmune disease immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA), the disorder does occur in all three varieties.

When pain and lameness in the rear legs struck her 12-week-old mantle Great Dane puppy, "Erik," Mari Lindland was heartbroken.

“Georgia” was an eight-time Master Agility Champion (MACH) when she was diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma on Sept. 10, 2014.

Most Dalmatian enthusiasts are proud to tell you that their breed is a healthy, long-lived one. The Dalmatian Club of America (DCA) plans to keep it that way.

Swollen, painful masticatory (chewing) muscles and an inability to open the mouth are clinical signs of the rare disorder masticatory muscle myositis (MMM).