Dog Articles

Dog Articles

Our extensive Pro Club article library features topics important to dog breeders
and enthusiasts alike. This includes rich information in subjects ranging from dog
nutrition to breed-specific health and hereditary concerns, as well as best practices
in breeding, kennel management, conditioning, and more.

Dog Articles

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When their 9-year-old brindle Boxer “Lyric” (CH LattaLane’s Irish Lyric) showed early-stage degenerative myelopathy (DM) in the spring of 2015, breeders Thomas J. and Carol Latta of Corder, Missouri, already recognized the signs.

Tick populations are at an all-time high this year, experts say. Dogs are particularly susceptible to ticks — and thus tick-borne diseases — because they spend a lot of time outdoors and are low to the ground where ticks live.

When a breakthrough in the discovery of the gene mutation that causes arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) in Boxers was announced in April 2009, breeders were ecstatic.

Co-owners Dave Berrey of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and Jay Serion of Seattle, who handled Decker in shows, consider it important to continue the health testing begun by the breeders. The winningest male Bulldog in the past 20 years, Decker, who earned 18 Bests in Show, is passing on his handsome phenotype and healthy genotype as a stud dog, having currently sired 15 litters.

Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in Doberman Pinschers is a challenging disease in which to identify dogs that will develop a severe case and die, and those that will be mildly affected despite testing positive in genetic screening.

Advances in research of hemangio­sarcoma in Golden Retrievers are helping to identify risk factors for the extremely aggressive and highly malignant canine cancer. The findings may one day be used to identify risk factors in other breeds.

When it comes to keeping canine athletes healthy, happy and injury-free, professional retriever trainer Mike Lardy of Handjem Kennels in Montello, Wisconsin, believes prevention is the best medicine.

Well-conditioned dogs capture our attention with their intensity and the ease with which they perform their sport.

Active dogs require water, especially during exercise, to work effectively. Mild dehydration in your dog can reduce endurance and strength, especially in hot weather conditions.

Hardworking sporting dogs benefit from higher proportions of fat in their diet. Why? Because, a dog’s metabolism relies primarily on fat for energy during rest and light to moderate intensity exercise.

Muscle power depends on protein. Not surprisingly, canine athletes that do not receive adequate dietary protein may suffer from fatigue and have a lackluster attitude and performance.

Active dogs, especially those that take part in endurance exercise, experience oxidative stress due to their prolonged increase in oxygen consumption.